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Wing Chun Vs. Tae Kwon Do

November 13, 2017 / in News, Self Defense Tips, Techniques and Styles / by Tim Kittelstad

Comparing martial arts has been happening for ages. It has it’s benefits but if not done with respect it has it’s pitfalls. Before I get into my article I want to clarify this article is a technical analysis of the two styles. It is not designed to bash either still but to show how one style would deal with the other. Wing Chun Vs. Tae Kwon Do is a hot topic because of how wide spread Tae Kwon Do is and the rising popularity of Wing Chun.  This article will hopefully give some insight into the two styles if someone is looking to train in one of them.

My Wing Chun Vs. Tae Kwon Do

Having started in Tae Kwon Do and now studying Wing Chun I use both in my training. Wing Chun is used as my primary art which I train against other ex Tae Kwon Do practitioners. I then return the favor as the “bad guy” helping my Wing Chun family against my Tae Kwon Do. Needless to say I have much experience using the two arts against each other. I will first address using my Wing Chun against Tae Kwon Do.

Wing Chun seeks to destroy the enemy as quickly as possible. Using structure and an overwhelming wave of attacks the aim to not give your opponent a chance. But to be maximized it must close the distance and keep it closed. Trapping can be utilized, which to someone who doesn’t grapple or know any counters, can be detrimental. The issue can be found in closing that distance. One of the most useful tools I employ is making sure I attack with at least two weapons.

Entry

Kicking while either blocking or intercepting an attack is a favorite. With my the Wing Chun structure keeping both hands and at least one foot in range allows me to hit multiple points at once. This disrupts most peoples timing. This also serves to slow down my opponent if he is very mobile. A stomping kick (or what we refer to as a Shadow Kick) to the thigh usually does the trick.

Understanding the Opponent

A Tae Kwon Do fighter will try to use his reach and distance. Switching kicks quickly can be tricky to deal with. However, if directness is maintained it won’t be a problem. Front kicks can be dealt with by using a Bui Ma step with a Gan Punch to clear the kick. A back up option is simply dropping the lead elbow on the ankle of the opponent. Round houses are usually stopped using a Double Jum Sao followed up with a back fist or chop. Because of the structure of Wing Chun once the distance is closed the opponent usually doesn’t have much of a response.

My Tae Kwon Do Vs. Wing Chun

When fighting another Wing Chun student the hardest part, as mentioned above, is the directness.
I must keep my distance and rely on speed, fakes, and mis-directions to even come close to landing a good strike. Using my lead foot I will fake low and go for a head shot. This is one of the most effective strikes if I time it properly. Second to that a spinning back kick can be slipped under the protecting hands of a Wing Chun Fighter if executed quickly enough.

The hardest part again, is keep the Wing Chun fighter away. Quick movement in and out, outside hook heel kicks, and low to high kicks are the best options.

Which One

Of the two systems I do prefer Wing Chun for combat.. Even though the Tae Kwon Do fighter might be more mobile, the Wing Chun system provides a more sound answer to attacks. Based on my experience Wing Chun allows me to end a fight much more quickly which to me is the most important part.

Tim Kittelstad

Tim Kittelstad

Originally from Lakeland Florida, Timothy Kittelstad always sought to be the best at what he did. Until a knee injury, he pursued a professional soccer career which ended in 2011. Once he found Sifu Och Wing Chun, he discovered a new home for his passion and drive. He views Sifu Och Wing Chun as both a place where he can learn under a great Sifu, and also study and practice one of the most effective combat systems in the world. Timothy now serves as the Manager at Sifu Och Wing Chun and not only pours his time and passion into his own training, but also to everyone who walks through their doors.
Tim Kittelstad

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